5 common mistakes when wearing a new suit

5 common mistakes when wearing a new suit.

As an ex-retailer, I’m only too aware of these most common mistakes that people make when wearing a brand new suit. Thankfully, as a bespoke tailor, I’m now able to spend a great deal of time with my clients and I can help and educate on various sartorial matters. Everyone loves wearing a brand new suit, especially if it has been lovingly handmade just for you as you’ll look and feel great in what you’re wearing, with added confidence and a spring in your step. Let’s have a look at the most common mistakes here.

IMG_6711

 

Pockets:

When you take your brand new suits home, you’ll soon realise that the pocket bags on the jacket are stitched closed. This is a very deliberate action by the suit maker, whether retail, made-to-measure or bespoke. For the retailer (or tailor), it helps the cloth on the jacket sit flat when hung, waiting for a buyer. Personally, I would advise that you leave your pocket bags stitched closed as the temptation to use the pocket for car keys, wallets and various other heavy items can be greater – resulting in stretching of the cloth (or sagging).

IMG_6616

 

Vent and Shoulder Threads:

Now this one really gets on my nerves. There’s a massive difference between Swelled Edge, Hand-stitched or AMF (American Machine and Foundry Pick Stitching) on a suit jacket – a very deliberate style option, and those little bits of thread that are in place to hold your vents down (tack or baste stitching). Tack and Baste Stitching is to be removed before wearing. Their sole purpose is to hold the back panel of the jacket flat in order that it doesn’t ride up or crease when on the hanger/in transit. If I see you in the street with tack or baste stitching still on your suit, I’m likely to let you know that it should be removed. I’ll most likely also have the appropriate tool on my person to do the job. Please don’t take offence as I’m trying to spare your blushes when you walk into that job interview or big meeting.

02ce815

 

Branding labels:

Usually found on the right hand sleeve of a branded suit. These aren’t something I encounter currently as I don’t put them onto my bespoke suits, but please take it from me – it’s not supposed to stay on when wearing. When you purchase your suit, here’s a handy tip. Ask the retailer to remove it for you. Sometimes, these can be stitched in place too tightly requiring quite a precise “stitch-unpicking tool” to remove it without damaging the cloth on the sleeve. If you try to remove this at home and don’t do a great job, you’ll have a hole in your sleeve and the retailer won’t take it back. This can mean an expensive repair which on a retail suit can often be more expensive than the suit itself.

 

One-Bar-Suit-Hanger-2

Hangers:

Hangers are vitally important to the longevity of your suit. The wrong shape hanger can destroy your internal construction, causing your shoulder pad to misshape and causing cloth to stretch. Please use a thick wooden or plastic hanger with a substantial shoulder end. This will support your shoulder when hanging in the wardrobe and will also allow the rest of the jacket to hang freely with the front and back panels separated adequately. You’ll find that this allows creases to remove themselves more efficiently, giving your suit a fresher look

Another piece of advice I regularly pass out is to use a clip hanger for your trousers on the day or two immediately after wearing your suit. Hang the trousers from the ankle. The waistband will provide enough weight to help any creases resolve themselves. It’ll also allow your pressed crease at the front and back of the trouser to last longer, requiring less professional care in the long run. Once you’re happy that the trousers have recovered suitably, place them back onto the suit hanger with the jacket.

 

83395_1000x1000

Ironing:

Don’t. Just don’t do it.

The temptation is there to iron your trousers after a hard day’s wear, but it’s most likely to cause damage to the cloth. The heat will stress the fibres causing them to snap and shine, and nobody wants to have shiny trousers. I always recommend Steam when caring for your garments. Whether professionally done, or at home, invest in a good steam cleaner. You’ll also fine a multitude of other household uses for one of these devices, but when it comes to your suit, steam is your best friend. This helps open up the fibres of the suit as you’re going along, which helps remove odour. You’ll also notice that the lifespan of your suits should be much longer.

 

For more information on mistakes men make with a new suit or to discuss our other bespoke suits, jackets and shirts, why not book an appointment at your home or office, Glasgow City Centre, Edinburgh City Centre or at our Roseberry Tailoring HQ. Simply click here to go straight to the booking page.

Leave a Comment

css.php