Mark Beaumont – Style & performance.

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MBPIC4Mark Beaumont is a Scottish adventurer, cyclist, broadcaster and speaker. On the 15th February 2008, he completed a gruelling 18,000 mile round the world trip, travelling through 20 countries – breaking the world record by a margin of 82 days.  Mark has since cycled the length of the Americas, set the World Record for Cairo to Cape Town, survived capsizing in the Atlantic ocean, climbed the highest mountains in the western world and rowed through the arctic.

2016 brought Mark his biggest challenge yet.  No matter how hard he trained, no matter how confident he felt, there was still something missing.  That’s when Mark met with Roseberry Tailoring having been recommended by a friend and fellow Roseberry client.  Mark regularly speaks at corporate and educational events, so needs a well fitting suit that looks as professional as his speeches sound.  Something stylish, yet subtle.  Something that would make a statement, yet not overshadow his content.  Something that would be memorable, but not the focus of each event.  Most importantly, something comfortable, and something that could be used for a broad range of events.

MBAPPThe Appointment

We packed a scattering of cloth options from our extensive range, and visited Mark at his Edinburgh address.  Let me just vouch for Mark’s coffee making skills here, one of the best in town.  A dash of milk would have given him the edge over the trendiest hotspots though.  We began discussing colours and textures, checks and stripes, linings and styles and soon built a much clearer picture of what was needed.  We whittled the range down to just a few options and discussed the features of each cloth, and why we thought each one would be appropriate.  Finally we decided upon a beautiful oversized Prince of Wales check in mid grey, with a bright blue running through the pattern.  This cloth is from the Italian mill, Vitale Barberis Canonico, who count the very famous Ermenegildo Zegna as one of their biggest clients.  They are one of the oldest cloth mills in the world, founded in 1663, and are still family owned to this day.  This particular cloth was sourced from their Venice range, super 150’s weave, allowing a sharp cut, but with comfort and an air of coolness in mind.

IMG_2845The Details

Many people see a suit on the peg and like the cloth it’s made from.  Of course, that’s a huge part of what it’s all about, but very few people pay attention to the smaller details, such as the buttonholes, or the pocket flap, the button thread or the lapel shape.  Even the buttons themselves are usually just accepted as part of the package, but paying a little attention to what you furnish the jacket and sleeves with can completely change the dynamic of the garments.  The same can be said for the angle of the pockets, or the depth of the flap.  Contrasting the jett of the pocket or the flap itself can have a huge bearing on the finished look.  It’s also common to not pay attention to the cloth itself, and it’s suitability to the task you wish to perform.  For example, lightweight doesn’t necessarily mean weak.  Likewise, heavy doesn’t always mean strong.  It’s important to pay attention to the client’s needs and understand which cloth options will work best for them.  In this case, we were looking for a cloth that would withstand occasional wear, usually indoors and under the lights in a room full of people. This wasn’t to be an everyday working suit, worn extensively and rarely rotated within the working wardrobe.  Here’s a link to one of the best blogs I’ve read on the subject. The Italian Super 150 was the perfect choice for Mark and so, with the cloth chosen, we moved onto the details to create the style.

MBPic2The Style

Mark and I had some great discussions about how this suit should look.  Again, taking into consideration the reason for the purchase in the first place, we looked at how we can achieve that memorable, but understated piece.  Firstly discussing the lining and trim details, then the lapel shape and style, the number of buttons on the jacket fasten, pockets, vents, cuffs and then the finishing details such as buttonholes, stitching and buttons.  Although it’s hard to imagine what garments are going to look like when completed, when you take each item one step at a time, it does help build the picture in your mind.  Mark was satisfied with the jacket choices and so, we began on the trouser style.  Again, attention was paid to the initial brief, making sure to make an impact, but not overshadow the speaker.  Mark made me very aware of his previous issues when purchasing trousers.  Being a man of a certain training regime, I had to ensure I paid a lot of attention to the thigh, whilst ensuring that I still created a slim leg.  Flat fronts on the trousers to suit Mark’s slim frame, and a plain finish at the ankle ensured nice clean lines.  On the back of the trouser, we recommended having at least one pocket to help create a more flattering look (trousers with no rear pocket tend to draw attention to the wearers posterior).  And with that, the design was complete.

 

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